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» Maxillofacial Prosthodontics
Maxillofacial prosthetics :

                 Maxillofacial prosthetics (Maxillofacial Prosthodontics) is a sub-specialty (or super-specialty) of Prosthodontics. It is the only recognized sub-specialty of all dental specialties by the American Dental Association. Maxillofacial prosthodontists treat patients who have acquired and congenital defects of the head and neck (maxillofacial) region due to cancer, surgery, trauma, and/or birth defects. Maxillary obturators, speech-aid prosthesis (formerly called as Pharyngeal/soft palate obturators) and mandibular-resection prostheses are the most common prostheses planned and fabricated by Maxillofacial prosthodontists. Other types of prostheses include artificial eyes, nose and other facial prostheses fabricated in conjunction with an anaplastologist.

                Treatment is multidisciplinary, involving oral and maxillofacial surgeons, plastic surgeons, head and neck surgeons, ENT doctors, oncologists, speech therapists, occupational therapists, physiotherapists, and other healthcare professionals.

               A maxillary obturator is a prosthesis that totally occludes an opening such as an oronasal fistula (in the roof of the mouth). They are similar to dental retainers, but without the front wire. Palatal obturators are typically short-term prosthetics used to close defects of the hard/soft palate that may affect speech production or cause nasal regurgitation during feeding. Following surgery, there may remain a residual orinasal opening on the palate, alveolar ridge, or labial vestibule. A palatal obturator may be used to compensate for hypernasality and to aid in speech therapy targeting correction of compensatory articulation caused by the cleft palate. In simpler terms, a palatal obturator covers any fistulas (or "holes") in the roof of the mouth that lead to the nasal cavity, providing the wearer with a plastic/acrylic, removable roof of the mouth, which aids in speech, eating, and proper air flow.

1) rehabilitation of patient with maxillary and orbital resection with magnet retained intraoral-extraoral combination prosthesis

2) rehabilitation of patient with maxillary resection with maxillary obturator prosthesis

3) feeding plate for a day old baby with cleft lip & cleft palate

Ocular Defect :

                Rehabilitation of patient with ocular defect by ocular prosthesis or artificial eye An ocular prosthesis or artificial eye is a type of craniofacial prosthesis that replaces an absent natural eye following an enucleation,evisceration, or orbital exenteration. The prosthesis fits over an orbital implant and under the eyelids. Often referred to as a glass eye, the ocular prosthesis roughly takes the shape of a convex shell and is made of medical grade plastic acrylic. A few ocular prostheses today are made of cryolite glass. A variant of the ocular prosthesis is a very thin hard shell known as a scleral shell which can be worn over a damaged or eviscerated eye. Makers of ocular prosthetics are known as ocularists. An ocular prosthesis does not provide vision; this would be a visual prosthesis. Someone with an ocular prosthesis is totally blind on the affected side and has monocular (one sided) vision.

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